yvi: XKCD comic: "You're flying! How" "Python!" (Python - Flying)
[personal profile] yvi posting in [community profile] homeeconomics101
Third verse, same as the first two:

Over the next few days, I will be trying to post one entry per day where people can share general tips and tricks they think could be valuable to others. No matter how basic they are or how few people you think would profit from them. Just think about how you do things and share this with others.



This entry is all about Do-it-yourself, home and car maintenance

Date: 2011-05-15 11:48 am (UTC)
seekingeden: sheepworld sheep holding out a red flower to the viewer (Default)
From: [personal profile] seekingeden
#About every eight weeks I clean the ledges on my windows so that between the rubber seal and the ledge there is no dust or dirt.[I can't think about how to translate what I mean any better, sorry]
It keeps the rubber alive longer.

#Twice a year, in spring and in autum I grease the rubber seals on windows with Vaseline/petrolium jelly. It stops the rubber from drying out during the winter and helps keep it flexible.

Date: 2011-05-15 02:04 pm (UTC)
From: [personal profile] alphaviolet
+1

Date: 2011-05-15 01:55 pm (UTC)
catie56: coffee, water glass, northanger abbey (Default)
From: [personal profile] catie56
not sure if this is maintenance, per se, but i'm going to post it anyway!

water spots on wood: when i get ugly white spots on my wood coffee tables, etc. from spills or lack of coaster use, i put a bit of mayonnaise on the white spot. let it sit for a bit, then wipe it off with a paper towel or cloth. it should take the spot out. you may have to reapply or let it sit longer for more stubborn spots.

(note: it also works when you accidentally spill nail polish remover on the wood, use a wet sponge to clean it, and then get unsightly wood damage. not that i have personal experience with that or anything.)

Date: 2011-05-15 09:05 pm (UTC)
cledon: Ocean waves pounding on rocks (Ocean Waves)
From: [personal profile] cledon
That is a handy tip. I'm a little careless with my cups *cough* so I'm going to remember it for the future.

Date: 2011-05-15 02:04 pm (UTC)
From: [personal profile] alphaviolet
If your car is in an accident and the paint is chipped but there's no other damage, you can repair it yourself by going to an auto supply store and getting paint that matches your car.

Date: 2011-05-15 02:08 pm (UTC)
From: [personal profile] alphaviolet
You can remove bumper stickers using either heat or chemicals. (I prefer heat because it is a less toxic alternative).

To use heat, you'll need a heat gun and a socket to plug it into. A heat gun is like a hair dryer, but much more powerful. It will make your bumper stickers peel off.

Auto supply shops usually have chemicals that can remove bumper stickers.

Date: 2011-05-16 11:16 am (UTC)
awils1: Nothing special; just a pixelated rainbow. (Default)
From: [personal profile] awils1
Eucalyptus oil is a natural but effective sticker remover!

Date: 2011-05-16 11:56 am (UTC)
From: [personal profile] alphaviolet
Cool! Thanks.

Date: 2011-05-15 02:11 pm (UTC)
From: [personal profile] alphaviolet
It is relatively easy to make your own roadside emergency kit. If you do a significant amount of driving, it's good to have these supplies around.

http://www.amazon.com/Just-Case-70-Piece-Auto-Safety/dp/B002S4NN0A

Date: 2011-05-15 04:14 pm (UTC)
majoline: picture of Majoline, mother of Bon Mucho in Loco Roco 2 (Default)
From: [personal profile] majoline
Washing your car windows with shaving cream will keep them from getting condensation.

And as with everything else in life, take care of problems or maintenance in your car early. Time to change your breaks? 50 USD Waiting until your break router has a gouge? 3000 USD

And I've just recently discovered that going into the same maintenance shop routinely usually gives you a discount. Our second oil change right at three months was half off the first one.

Date: 2011-05-15 06:43 pm (UTC)
sporky_rat: The Badge of the Young Pioneers - Lenin's head in a red star with red flame above, the words in Cyrillic,'Always Ready!' (tovaritch)
From: [personal profile] sporky_rat
Shaving cream? really? just plain barbasol would work?

Date: 2011-05-17 08:07 pm (UTC)
majoline: picture of Majoline, mother of Bon Mucho in Loco Roco 2 (Default)
From: [personal profile] majoline
Yeah, actually! The same soap texture that makes it easy to get hair off prevents water from adhering to your windows.

I thought it was nonsense until I tried it myself.

Date: 2011-05-16 01:34 am (UTC)
From: [personal profile] chaostheory635
also, if you replace your brake pads in time, you can take the rotors into a parts store and have them machined down--this way you don't even need new rotors every time. (but you can only do this about once or twice for each set of rotors!)

or, if you're looking for a good mechanic, ask around at a parts store! (o'reilly's in particular tends to deliver parts to local mechanics, so they know a lot of them and they're generally up on who's good for what.)

Date: 2011-05-17 08:08 pm (UTC)
majoline: picture of Majoline, mother of Bon Mucho in Loco Roco 2 (Default)
From: [personal profile] majoline
True! (We do all our own car stuff, so I'm not good at finding mechanics, unless you live near me.)

Date: 2011-05-15 06:36 pm (UTC)
seekingeden: sheepworld sheep holding out a red flower to the viewer (Default)
From: [personal profile] seekingeden
Cleaning your heaters from dust makes them a) more effective and b) it cuts down on dust floating around since expecially heaters with covered vents collect dust like woah.
I usually clean my heaters before I switch them on before I turn them on for the first time and regularly during the winter.
And if you are like me and didn't know there are dust brushes especially for heaters go forth and buy one instead of fiddling around with cloth and a curtain rod *ahem*

Date: 2011-05-15 07:23 pm (UTC)
ninetydegrees: Drawing: a girl's face, with a yellow and green stripe over one eye (Default)
From: [personal profile] ninetydegrees
Walnut stain is good for scratches on dark furniture, kitchen counters and wood floors but simple walnuts can do the trick very nicely for a while too. Coffee grounds work too, I think.

Screwdrivers, pliers, hammers, power drills and scissors which can cut all kinds of materials (they look a bit like garden clippers) are your friends. Put them where you can easily access them and learn how to use them if you don't.

If you're like me and can't remember how to start/stop stopcocks or valves (is it clockwise or counterclockwise?), make a drawing or write instructions on a piece of paper and stick it on your fridge.
Edited Date: 2011-05-15 07:25 pm (UTC)

Date: 2011-05-15 08:46 pm (UTC)
cledon: Yellow and white dandelions in vase on windowsill (Dandelions)
From: [personal profile] cledon
To remember which direction to turn things, I use the phrase, "Lefty loosy, righty tighty" (left to loosen, right to tighten). The nonsense children's rhyme quality makes it easy for me to remember.

Date: 2011-05-15 08:50 pm (UTC)
ninetydegrees: Drawing: woman laughing (laughter)
From: [personal profile] ninetydegrees
I'm sure that's very useful for people who can tell their left from their right. I generally can't. :)

Date: 2011-05-15 09:01 pm (UTC)
cledon: San Francisco hill with dramatic pink clouds (Bernal Clouds)
From: [personal profile] cledon
Yeah, I can see how that would render my mnemonic useless. *g* Graphics are clearly the way to go then.

Date: 2011-05-16 03:39 am (UTC)
cledon: Bright yellow sunrise over dark mountain. (Sunrise)
From: [personal profile] cledon
Apparently my brain was churning away at this. How about this one? If clockwise and anti-clockwise work as directions for you then:

"Clockwise closes, anti- opens."

Date: 2011-05-16 04:30 am (UTC)
ninetydegrees: Drawing: a girl's face, with a yellow and green stripe over one eye (Default)
From: [personal profile] ninetydegrees
I'm afraid I won't remember that. My brain's not wired that way. Plus English isn't my native language. I'm doing fine with my little drawings really.

Date: 2011-05-16 03:12 pm (UTC)
cledon: San Francisco hill with dramatic pink clouds (Bernal Clouds)
From: [personal profile] cledon
I know and I don't mean to be pushy. You have a method that works for you. The rhyme just popped into my head and I thought it was funny. Sometimes I overshare. Ignore me. :-)



Date: 2011-05-15 09:03 pm (UTC)
cledon: Female devil's food cake surrounded by temptations (Devil Food Cake)
From: [personal profile] cledon
How do you use just the walnut? Rub the outer shell on the scratch or do you need to do something more?

Date: 2011-05-15 09:06 pm (UTC)
ninetydegrees: Drawing: a girl's face, with a yellow and green stripe over one eye (Default)
From: [personal profile] ninetydegrees
Exactly like you said. Just make sure the oil goes into the scratch or it'll wash away too soon if it's something you wet regularly.

Date: 2011-05-15 08:56 pm (UTC)
cledon: Bright yellow sunrise over dark mountain. (Sunrise)
From: [personal profile] cledon
A couple years ago my brother was watching in utter horror as I hammered a nail into the wall with a can of peas. What? It worked. For my next birthday, I got a basic toolkit. It's been really useful, especially the pliers which double as nutcrackers and soda bottletop looseners and tongs to pull small items out of boiling water, etc. But I think my favorite tool of all (and I didn't know it existed until he bought me one) is the rubber mallet. That thing is awesome!

If you're putting together furniture from a kit, the mallet will bang together stuff that doesn't quite want to fit together without damaging the finish. Likewise, when it's time to breakdown the furniture for a move, the mallet taps the stuck pieces apart. Also, I have a step ladder that has a safety lock on it. I can never pull the lock apart to flatten the ladder for storage. Lifting lever and whacking the underside of the step breaks it apart perfectly. Bam! The mallet replaces the hand and arm strength I've lost as I got older.

Another useful items is shims, triangular pieces of wood you can buy at a hardware store and slip under the wobbly leg of a chair. I also use it under my bookcases to tip them slightly back against the wall so they're less likely to fall forward if the balance is off.

Date: 2011-05-15 11:40 pm (UTC)
erika: (science: physics)
From: [personal profile] erika
Yes! This! <sings the praises of the rubber mallet!>

Date: 2011-05-16 03:29 am (UTC)
cledon: Yellow and white dandelions in vase on windowsill (Dandelions)
From: [personal profile] cledon
Inorite? Folks who don't have one just don't know. *sadface for all the mallet deprived people*

Date: 2011-05-16 02:21 am (UTC)
From: [personal profile] chaostheory635
Windshield wiper blades are kinda pricey, but you can buy the rubber insert (which is the part that really wears out anyway!) for much less money and trim it to fit your wipers.

Keeping your tire pressure at the correct level will improve your fuel economy.

Date: 2011-05-17 08:10 pm (UTC)
majoline: picture of Majoline, mother of Bon Mucho in Loco Roco 2 (Default)
From: [personal profile] majoline
And maintaining your tire pressure keep you from having flats and increase the lifespan of your tires.

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